PEDRO PIZARRO. RELATION OF THE DISCOVERY AND CONQUEST OF THE KINGDOMS OF PERU. VOLUME 2


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PEDRO PIZARRO. RELATION OF THE DISCOVERY AND CONQUEST OF THE KINGDOMS OF PERU. VOLUME II.
Педро Писарро. Сообщение об Открытии и Завоевании Королевств Перу. Том 2.

PEDRO PIZARRO. RELATION OF THE DISCOVERY AND CONQUEST OF THE KINGDOMS OF PERU. VOLUME II

IN TWO VOLUMES

VOLUME II

TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH AND ANNOTATED

BY

PHILIP AINSWORTH MEANS

THE CORTES SOCIETY

NEW YORK

1021

COCKAYNE, BOSTON

RELATION

[CONTINUED]

RELATION OF THE DISCOVERY AND CONQUEST OF
THE KINGDOMS OF PERU, AND OF THE GOVERN-
MENT AND ARRANGEMENTS WHICH THE NA-
TIVES OF THEM FORMERLY HAD, AND OF THE
TREASURES WHICH WERE FOUND THEREIN,
AND OF THE OTHER EVENTS WHICH HAVE
TAKEN PLACE IN THOSE REALMS UP TO THE

DAY ON WHICH THE RELATION WAS SIGNED

BY PEDRO PIZARRO, A CONQUEROR AND
SETTLER OF THOSE SAID KINGDOMS, AND A

CITIZEN OF THE CITY OF AfiEQUIPA, IN THE
YEAR 1571

VOLUME II

The Marquis, having set out from Cuzco,
went to Xauxa in order to found there a city
of Spaniards, and there he found Soto and
Mango Inga. They had returned, because
the warriours whom Quizquiz led were now
routed by the attack which the Spaniards
delivered against them, and, in his [Soto's]
pursuit, he had gone beyond Atavillos, where

285

286 Pedro Pizarro

Quizquiz had disappeared, fleeing with some
few Indians toward Quito, where afterwards
he was killed by the Indian natives, because
the Spaniards never had him in their hands.
Don Diego de Almagro with some Spaniards
went to Quito, because news was received
that Don Pedro de Alvarado had disembarked
at Puerto Viejo with five hundred men from
Guatimala and that he was even now travers-
ing the mountains between Puerto Viejo and
Quito, as indeed he was. In this [city of]
Quito was Benalcazar with some troops he
had gathered, by command of the Marquis,
at Tangarala, who had come thither from
Nicaragua after it [Tangarala] was founded.
To this Benalcazar the Marquis sent [a mes-
sage] from Caxamalca, ordering him to collect
all the troops I mention [and as many more]
as might be found and to go to Quito so as to
occupy that land in his [Pizarro's] name,
because he was suspicious lest some captain
come and occupy this province of Quito on
the ground that it was not settled by Span-
iards.

Relation 287

Having arrived at Quito, Don Diego de
Almagro received word that Don Pedro de
Alvarado was now drawing nigh, and he sent
messengers to him to inform him that Quito
had been settled by his companion Don
Francisco Pizarro, and [advising him] not to
stir up rebellion in the land because com-
plaint [of his doing so] would be made to His
Majesty. When Don Pedro de Alvarado
learned that the Marquis had already con-
quered this entire kingdom and had established
some villages in it, he came to see Don Diego
de Almagro, and he entered into agreement
with him to the effect that he [Almagro]
should pay him for the expenses which he
had incurred on account of his fleet, and that
he [Alvarado] should leave his troops there and
return to Guatimala. They agreed that he
[Alvarado] should be given ninety thousand
castellanos, and when this agreement was
made he handed over the troops whom he
led, and he and Don Diego de Almagro re-
turned from Pachacama with all the troops
who came with him.

288 Pedro Pizarro

To return now to the Marquis who was in
Xauxa making the settlement. He divided
up the neighbouring Indians [among the set-
tlers] and founded his town in Xauxa. 108
This he did before he had news of the agree-
ment made with Don Pedro de Alvarado. He
settled here in order not to leave unprotected
the highlands and because of the fewness of
the Spaniards there [which caused him to fear]
lest the mountaineers, who were many, arise
in rebellion. Having formed this settlement,
he sent Soto to Cuzco, making him his lieu-
tenant in that city [and giving him] a few
Spaniards. At the same time he sent Mango
Inga to go with Soto to Cuzco. This done,
the Marquis was desirous of seeing Pacha-
cama and Chincha, which were much praised,
and taking with him twenty men he set out
to see them, leaving in Xauxa as his lieutenant
Grabiel de Rojas who had just come from
Nicaragua. 107 Then the Marquis set forth
for Pachacama, and having arrived there, he
remained several days, and from there he
set forth to see Chincha, and while he was

Relation 289

there Grabiel de Rojas wrote to him to tell
him that the land was all uneasy and like to
break out into rebellion, and [asking him]
to betake himself with all speed to Xauxa.
As soon as these letters were received, the
Marquis set out, and passing up through the
valley of Lunaguan he arrived at Xauxa
where he was well received by the Spaniards,
and the Indians relapsed into calm. While he
was in this place a messenger arrived from
Almagro who sent him from Quito after the
agreements with Don Pedro de Alvarado in
order to give information about what had
been agreed and carried out with respect to
Don Pedro de Alvarado. The messenger who
came here with this news was Diego de
Agtiero who had gone with Almagro. Then,
when the Marquis Don Francisco Pizarro
knew of the good success of his companion,
and as he saw that the Spanish pioneers were
losing their fear of the natives, he deter-
mined to move the town of Xauxa to Lima,
where it now is, which is the city of the
Kings, and so he set forth and made his

290 Pedro Pizarro

camp at Pachacama where he awaited Don
Pedro de Alvarado and Don Diego de Alma-
gro, and from there he sent to examine the
site of the city of the Kings in the valley of
Lima, where he settled, as has been said.
And at this time arrived Don Pedro de Al-
varado and Don Diego de Almagro with all
the troops whom Don Pedro de Alvarado had
brought to this kingdom. When they ar-
rived here, there were great rejoicings and
games with canes. And, at the end of some
days, Don Pedro de Alvarado was rested, and
he was given his money, although Almagro
had won almost half of it from him. He em-
barked and returned to Guatimala, leaving all
of his soldiers in this land, and the Marquis
passed on to Lima and founded the city of the
Kings which still exists. 108

This founding of the city of the Kings hav-
ing been accomplished, the Marquis Don
Francisco Pizarro gave power such as he him-
self had to Don Diego de Almagro, his com-
panion, and he sent him to the city of Cuzco
in order that he might take up his residence

Relation 291

there and distribute the Indians to those
persons to whom he perceived it advisable to
give them. Don Diego de Almagro, being in
possession of this authority, set forth for the
city of Cuzco, taking with him the greater
part of the troops whom Don Pedro de Al-
varado had brought with him, as well as other
gentlemen such as Victores de Alvarado.
And to some of the men of Alvarado and to
Don Gomez de Luna he [Pizarro] gave occu-
pation, giving [also] to some of them the
Chachapoyas, and others he sent down to
Puerto Viejo and others he took with him to
Chimo, which is the valley where Trujillo
lies and after having sent off Almagro, as has
been told, he [Pizarro] went to found the city
of Trujillo, 109 and there he gave good cheer
to some of those who had come with Don
Pedro de Alvarado, although others of them
who went with Almagro to Cuzco came back
so puffed up and haughty that the whole of
this kingdom of Peru seemed to them but a
slight matter. And so they determined to go
to Chile with Don Diego de Almagro,

292 Pedro Pizarro

believing that there they would find another
Peru. Then, Don Diego de Almagro having
arrived at Cuzco with the troops already men-
tioned, and while he was there in all tran-
quility, the news reached him that His
Majesty had made him a grant of the govern-
orship of the lands beyond the borders [of
the jurisdiction] of the Marquis Don Francisco
Pizarro. While he was waiting for the des-
patches, those of the men of Don Pedro de
Alvarado whom he had with him convinced
him that Cuzco fell within the limits of his
governorship. On getting wind of this, Joan
Pizarro and Gonzalo Pizarro his brother,
who were in Cuzco, spoke to their friends
about it, for they had many, in order that they
might not yield to the intrigues of the men
of Alvarado and Almagro. And while he
was in this [city], Almagro believed that Joan
Pizarro was making ready to go out upon the
road to seize the despatches [granting to
Almagro] his government, and [moved by]
this rumour which was spread abroad, he
[Almagro] likewise made ready a body of

Relation 293

troops, and although it was understood that
his purpose was to possess himself of Cuzco,
he feigned what I have related. At this time
Soto was corregidor. He favoured Almagro,
and one day he came to where Joan Pizarro
was with his friends in order to incarcerate
him in his dwelling, but failing to do the same
to Don Diego de Almagro. Then, on account
of this matter, Joan Pizarro and Soto had
words, for Joan Pizarro told him that he was
unfairly partial, and Soto replied that it was
not so, whereupon Joan Pizarro seized a lance
and stuck Soto with it, and, had not he [Soto]
quickly fled upon the horse he was riding, he
would have been overthrown by the blows of
the lance. Joan Pizarro followed him until
he chased him into the place where Almagro
was, and, had not the friends and soldiers of
Almagro succoured him, he [Joan Pizarro]
would have slain him, for Joan Pizarro was a
very valiant and ireful man. And when

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